Story from the Courier Mail 11 June

Gorgeous sights a magnet for locals

With his flying wings clipped, a grounded Townsville-based travel writer seizes the opportunity to rediscover his own backyard.

Townsville
A

s a travel writer, I’m used to traversing the globe, but thanks to international travel bans I’ve turned my focus to some local attractions and pursuits. The easing of restrictions across Queensland provides a wonderful chance to reacquaint myself with the myriad things to do in the region and provide some local businesses with much-needed support.

DAY 1

The bright sun causes the deep blue sea to sparkle as the catamaran picks up speed. White fingers of foam stream behind us as Townsville city drops away. Ahead, tropical Magnetic Island looms large. I see sandy beaches bookended by rocky headlands strewn with huge boulders with forested hills behind.

The Barefoot Art Food Wine Cafe on Magnetic Island.

The Barefoot Art Food Wine Cafe on Magnetic Island.

I’m reminded why my planned 12-month stay in Queensland has turned into 40-something years.

The Nelly Bay terminal is our starting point and this is the departure point for the island’s buses (a day pass costs $7.20) but I am keen on an open-top rental car.

Renting the car is easy and my wife and I are off to walk the iconic jetty at Picnic Bay, follow the Nelly Bay Snorkel Trail, swim at magical Alma Bay, then slip over to Horseshoe Bay for lunch. The Barefoot Art Food Wine Cafe at Horseshoe Bay (barefootartfoodwine.com.au) is where we meet some Townsville friends, so it is perfect to order a seafood platter to share. Wow! Bugs, prawns, Thai fish cakes, salt and pepper squid, fish, chips and salad are enjoyed by all.

Brand reveal

After such a feast, we feel the need for some physical activity so after checking out the local water sports options – jet skiing, kayaking, knee boarding, water skiing and tube riding – we park the car in the Forts car park and head out in search of koalas and grand views. Quickly we find both.

The day is fast disappearing but at Geoffrey Bay we spot dozens of rock wallabies amongst the boulders and on the old road. We stop to watch before contemplating dinner plans.

Do we opt for the inviting Peppers Blue on Blue Resort (peppers.com.au) near the ferry terminal or do we return to Townsville and eat at the award-winning Touch of Salt (atouchofsalt.com.au)? A drink at Peppers and dinner at Salt solves this problem.

DAY 2

We rise late, ready to play tourists in Townsville. The Strand and the blue Coral Sea attract us, so we breakfast outdoors on the water’s edge at C-Bar (cbar.com.au). A fresh fruit salad with mango yoghurt and goji berry granola takes my fancy while my wife has crepes filled with grilled mango and bacon, topped with honey ricotta and berry compote.

Cloudy Creek Walk near the village of Paluma.

Cloudy Creek Walk near the village of Paluma.

Determined to get some exercise, we walk the 1.5km to the Rock Pool and back passing the fishing jetty, two lifesaver-patrolled beaches, public exercise gear, artworks and more. It really deserves more time but we plan on heading north to enjoy one of Townsville’s secrets.

Balgal Beach is 50 minutes north of the city. There is a netted area for swimming, great fishing and a nice foreshore park with children’s playground. Best of all there are few people. Gentle waves of variegated turquoise brush against the beach as we chill out. After a lazy couple of hours, we drop into Fisherman’s Landing for some of the best fish and chips in North Queensland.

A little further north, a road leads to the Paluma Range and its World Heritage rainforest. We stop at picturesque Little Crystal Creek then drive on to Paluma township. This secluded mountain retreat has excellent views from McClelland’s Lookout and fabulous rainforest walks.

Little Crystal Creek with its historic stone arch bridge.

Little Crystal Creek with its historic stone arch bridge.

Another half hour gets us to the Hidden Valley Cabins (hiddenvalleycabins.com.au), where a platypus viewing tour provides us with one of our best wildlife viewing experiences ever.

DAY 3

After the excitement of last night, we enjoy a lazy breakfast at Hidden Valley Cabins before setting our car satnav for Cardwell and its picturesque Cardwell Spa Pool. After recent rains you can swim in the water, which ranges from a bright baby-blue to a milky blue, depending on the time of day and levels of sunlight. The colour is the result of a chemical reaction with the rocks. As we leave Cardwell, we grab a pie from the foreshore pie cart.

At Ingham, we lunch at JK’s Deli (jksdelicatessen.com) before heading for the Tyto Wetlands on the town’s outskirts where pathways allow for close-up bird watching.

Before heading home, we take a turn inland towards the Seaview Range and Wallaman Falls. These sublime falls are Australia’s tallest, tumbling 268m into a 20m deep pool below. They’re an undisputed highlight of Queensland’s Wet Tropics World Heritage Area, and a must-see for visitors and locals alike.

Refreshed and recharged, we return to the city and home. With so much to see and do, you’ll need a very good reason to leave Townsville and this holiday reminds me that I haven’t found one yet.

Australia’s East Coast Highlights

Posted on May 20 2020 
Views:105

Australia’s East Coast Highlights

Words: Len Rutledge Images: Phensri Rutledge

Australia continues to attract many visitors because of its animals, lifestyle and sunshine but just about all are surprised at its size. Australia is larger than Europe so don’t expect to be able to see the whole country in one visit unless you are planning on a three month vacation or a two year working holiday. The East Coast is the most populated area so this is not a bad place to start. From Melbourne in the south to Cairns in the north is around 3000 kilometres but there are several great places to visit in between.

Melbourne

We start in the World’s Most Liveable City and quickly see why it has scored this award for several years. Melbourne is Australia’s sporting, coffee, restaurant and arts capital. Depending on your interest you can attend the Australian Tennis Open, the Formula 1 Australian Grand Prix, the AFL Football Final Series, the Melbourne Cup Horse Racing Carnival and international cricket tests. A recent study found Melbourne hosts over 60,000 live concerts annually, making it one of the live music capitals of the world. The city has more theatres and performance venues than anywhere else in Australia. There are approximately 5000 cafes and restaurants in the city, the highest per capita in the world. Many are top class.

Australias East Coast Highlights

Flinders Street Railway Station, Melbourne

Canberra

Australia’s little-known capital is well worth a visit. There is nothing old here but there are modern buildings aplenty. Parliament House, the Australian War Memorial, the National Gallery of Australia, the National Library of Australia, the National Science and Technology Centre, the National Zoo and Aquarium, the National Museum of Australia and more, will have you extending your stay.

Australias East Coast Highlights

Looking towards Parliament House from the Australian War Memorial, Canberra

Sydney

Located on the East Coast of Australia, Sydney is the oldest and largest of the Australian cities and today the city’s attractions are dominated by the Opera House and Harbour Bridge. There is a guided walking tour of the Opera House and you can join a guided ascent of the bridge. Between these two is Circular Quay, the city’s main ferry terminal and just nearby is The Rocks where more than 100 heritage sites and buildings jostle along the narrow streets. Elsewhere, Darling Harbour is a waterfront pedestrian precinct packed with shops, restaurants, museums, exhibitions, and entertainment venues. Sydney is famous for its beaches from tiny harbourside strips of sand to Bondi, Coogee, Bronte, Tamarama, Maroubra, Manly Collaroy, Dee Why, and Narrabeen on the Pacific Ocean.

Australias East Coast Highlights

Circular Quay with fountain, Opera House and Harbour Bridge, Sydney

Brisbane

Once it was called a big country town but Brisbane has now grown up. Across the river from the CBD, South Bank is home to the Cultural Centre with its world-class galleries and entertainment. You can climb the Storey Bridge, cuddle a koala at Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary, while Morton Island is the place to feed wild dolphins and snorkel around an old ship wreck. One hundred kilometres to the south is the famous Gold Coast with its excellent beaches, theme parks, restaurants and nightlife. To the north is the Sunshine Coast for more beach activity.

Australias East Coast Highlights

South Bank artificial beach looking towards Brisbane CBD

North Queensland Islands

With rugged coastlines and surrounding reefs bursting with life, you are spoiled for choice when choosing an island off the coast of North Queensland. Many are wholly or partly National Parks and many have nature viewing, snorkelling and sailing opportunities, and bush trails. Quite a few have accommodation. Some are very up-market such as One & Only Hayman, Hamilton, Orpheus, Badarra and Lizard while others have a range of rooms from excellent to budget. Magnetic Island off Townsville is the easiest to reach with ferries and car barges making the crossing multiple times a day.

Australias East Coast Highlights

Visitors to our room on Daydream Island

The Great Barrier Reef

The Great Barrier Reef is blessed with the breathtaking beauty of the world’s largest coral reef. This is one of the seven wonders of the natural world, larger than the Great Wall of China, and the only living thing on earth visible from space. A visitor can enjoy snorkelling, scuba diving, aircraft or helicopter tours, bare boats (self-sail), glass-bottomed boat viewing, semi-submersibles and educational trips, whale watching, and swimming with dolphins. Townsville is the headquarters of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority and it is home to the world’s largest living coral reef aquarium. Reef trips leave from many other northern towns including Cairns and Port Douglas.

Australias East Coast Highlights

The headquarters of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, Townsville

www.lenrutledge.com